Orthodox economic measures like Gross Domestic product fail to measure the things that matter most, write Judith Schleicher & Bhaskar Vira: like human wellbeing and ecological health. This creates a systematic bias in ‘development’ policies that must urgently be addressed if we are to build an inclusive, equitable and sustainable society.  Without nature, humans could be neither healthy nor happy.

And yet the natural world can be completely ransacked without causing even a tiny blip on our usual measures of economic progress or poverty. The Conversation A major UN environmental meeting recently looked at launching an assessment of the different values that people attribute to nature, and what nature contributes to human societies. However, these high level discussions will be futile unless our measures of societal progress expand to explicitly include what nature does for human well-being and prosperity, especially for poor people.

Nature matters to people’s well-being in many different ways. It obviously provides us with basic needs such as food, clean air and water, as well as protection from environmental hazards. There is also a clear relationship with both physical and mental well-being, especially for those who are fortunate enough to have access to green spaces

Read more: Measures of poverty and well-being still ignore the environment – this must change – The Ecologist