BLOOMINGTON, Ind. — People who recently experienced severe weather events such as floods, storms and drought are more likely to support policies to adapt to the effects of climate change, according to a new study co-authored by an Indiana University researcher.

But the relationship between exposure to extreme weather and support for climate policies is small, the study finds. And it fades quickly; a month after an extreme weather event, there was no effect.

“People respond to recent weather, whether it’s temperature spikes, severe storms or other events,” said David Konisky, an associate professor in the School of Public and Environmental Affairs and an author of the study. “But the effects are small. Extreme weather is much less significant than other factors when it comes to attitudes about climate.”

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