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Environment Which Type Of Internet Can Best Reduce Environmental Footprint?

You probably don’t spend much time thinking about the environmental impact of the Internet. Many people think the Internet is totally green. While the Internet is better for the environment than traditional forms of communication, like snail mail, it still leaves an impact on the environment. One study found it produces around 300 million tons

2020-04-02T08:46:18-05:00Tags: |

Report reveals ‘massive plastic pollution footprint’ of drinks firms

Four global drinks giants are responsible for more than half a million tonnes of plastic pollution in six developing countries each year, enough to cover 83 football pitches every day, according to a report. The NGO Tearfund has calculated the greenhouse gas emissions from the open burning of plastic bottles, sachets and cartons produced by Coca-Cola, PepsiCo,

Trump to roll back Obama-era clean car rules in huge blow to climate fight

The Trump administration is rolling back the US government’s strongest attempt to combat the climate crisis, weakening rules which compel auto companies to produce more fuel-efficient vehicles. Critics say the move will lead to more life-threatening air pollution and force Americans to spend more on gasoline. The changes to Obama-era regulations will allow vehicles to emit about

The Coronavirus Pandemic Shows Us The Importance Of Combating Climate Change

The common fruit fly – which lives one to two months, suggesting insignificance – has changed the world through medical research, leading to eight Nobel prizes in human genetics and disease prevention breakthroughs. Today an even smaller organism, Coronavirus, is changing the world even more significantly. And confronting it with the same opportunity for breakthroughs as scientists

10 ways coronavirus is changing energy and climate change

The novel coronavirus, upending our world as we know it, is also changing how we consume energy and address climate change. Driving the news: The various impacts are occurring both now and into the future. Most changes don’t bode well for acting on climate change and transitioning to cleaner energy. Five changes happening now: Lower emissions

Heat stress may affect more than 1.2 billion people annually by 2100

Heat stress from extreme heat and humidity will annually affect areas now home to 1.2 billion people by 2100, assuming current greenhouse gas emissions, according to a Rutgers study. That's more than four times the number of people affected today, and more than 12 times the number who would have been affected without industrial era

2020-03-19T07:53:02-05:00Tags: |

If you’re poor, poverty is an environmental issue

In 2017, when interviewers asked Latino community members in San Antonio, Texas, about their top environmental concerns, the answers took researchers by surprise. Poverty. Inequality. Education. Racism. “They started bringing up things that don’t typically come up in environmental studies,” said Neil Lewis Jr. ’13, assistant professor of communication in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences.

2020-03-17T11:52:51-05:00Tags: |

Heat stress may affect 1.2 billion people annually by 2100

Heat stress from extreme heat and humidity will annually affect areas now home to 1.2 billion people by 2100, assuming current greenhouse gas emissions, according to a Rutgers study. That's more than four times the number of people affected today, and more than 12 times the number who would have been affected without industrial era

2020-03-16T16:26:11-05:00Tags: |

Study reveals how environment influences the spread of infectious disease

With outbreaks of infectious diseases making headlines around the world, scientists are under pressure to understand the drivers that influence the transmission of pathogens in order to better predict and control disease outbreaks. A new research study led by Professor Kathleen Alexander of the College of Natural Resources and Environment explores the ways that landscapes

2020-03-15T08:08:54-05:00Tags: |

Post-coronavirus crisis looming for the environment

The rapid outbreak of the novel coronavirus, known as COVID-19, among countries around the world is not only a huge challenge for the public health, but the environment will also bear its dire consequences. Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses. Some cause illness in people and others only infect animals. Very rarely have animal

2020-03-13T07:03:52-05:00Tags: |

Corn productivity in real time

University of Illinois scientists, with help from members of the Illinois Corn Growers Association, have developed a new, scalable method for estimating crop productivity in real time. The research, published in Remote Sensing of Environment, combines field measurements, a unique in-field camera network, and high-resolution, high-frequency satellite data, providing highly accurate productivity estimates for crops

2020-03-11T13:17:18-05:00Tags: |

Fifth Environment Assembly to focus on nature

With less than a year before the world meets for the fifth session of the United Nations Environment Assembly, the UN’s highest-level environmental forum, “Strengthening Actions for Nature to Achieve the Sustainable Development Goals” has been announced as the theme. The fifth session will take place from 22 – 26 February 2021 in Nairobi, Kenya.

2020-03-09T10:24:57-05:00Tags: |

How Big Oil and Big Soda kept a global environmental calamity a secret for decades

Every human on Earth is ingesting nearly 2,000 particles of plastic a week. These tiny pieces enter our unwitting bodies from tap water, food, and even the air, according to an alarming academic study sponsored by the World Wildlife Fund for Nature, dosing us with five grams of plastics, many cut with chemicals linked to cancers,

Why don’t we treat the climate crisis with the same urgency as coronavirus?

It is a global emergency that has already killed on a mass scale and threatens to send millions more to early graves. As its effects spread, it could destabilise entire economies and overwhelm poorer countries lacking resources and infrastructure. But this is the climate crisis, not the coronavirus. Governments are not assembling emergency national plans

A great civilization brought low by climate change

Climate change has been called the existential threat of our age. But it isn’t the first time a civilization has come into conflict with a shift in the natural world. Speaking on “The Ancient Maya Response to Climate Change: A Cautionary Tale” at the Peabody Museum on Thursday evening, Arizona State University Professor Billie L.

2020-03-04T06:17:20-06:00Tags: |