The need for sustainable IT has never been more acute as enterprises tackle complex and data-heavy challenges from the edge to the cloud, against a backdrop of increasing energy costs and resource limitations, an urgent climate crisis, and tightening regulations. IT organisations that are fast to transform can exceed their financial, sustainability, and business objectives to seize a competitive advantage in this hybrid world. Although getting up and running is often easier said than done, undertaking a digital transformation presents a unique opportunity for organisations to critically review the inefficiencies of their ageing on-premises IT estates and consider how to structure their modernisation with sustainability in mind.

A circular approach

While organisations are often aware of the potential efficiency gains and cost effectiveness of transitioning to the cloud, few have a complete understanding of the energy and natural resource demands of the IT hardware and data centre infrastructure that house it. While there is significant work being done to improve power usage effectiveness (PUE) of data centres, the environmental costs of producing servers, their durability, and their end-of-life management is often overlooked. Environmental impacts across the entire lifecycle of IT hardware and equipment must be considered in sustainable procurement practices. At HPE, a complete lifecycle approach to innovation is enabling our company and our customers to reduce their environmental footprints while contributing to what is often referred to as the ‘circular economy’, an economic model in which the value of natural resources are maximised and waste is minimised.

In addition, given the rapid obsolescence of IT hardware, solution providers can further minimise the environmental impacts of their IT by responsibly retiring aging asset for refurbishment and reuse. Through continued investment in people and facilities, including our state-of-the-art Technology Renewal Centre in Scotland, HPE is not only delivering practical assistance with the environmentally responsible removal, reuse and recycling of end-of-life equipment, but we’re also unlocking tangible residual value from the reassignment of that equipment to help fund new innovation.

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